Jald. 22. game of thrones. captain america. sebastian stan. lena heady. natalie dormer.

lot of stuff, actually.
hello.

Most of the intelligence community doesn’t believe he exists. The ones that do call him the Winter Soldier.

Favourite Movies: Sunshine, (2007)  

"At the end of time, a moment will come when just one man remains.Then the moment will pass. Man will be gone.There will be nothing to show that we were ever here…but stardust."

Here was one with an air of high nobility such as Aragorn at times revealed, less high perhaps, yet also less incalculable and remote: one of the Kings of Men born into a later time, but touched with the wisdom and sadness of the Eldar Race. He knew now why Beregond spoke his name with love. He was a captain that men would follow, that he would follow, even under the shadow of the black wings.

"I have till the rain stops."

Welcome to San Francisco

hypnoticlandscape:

daniel ablitt


Oh, if the sky comes falling down for youThere’s nothing in this world I wouldn’t do.

Oh, if the sky comes falling down for you
There’s nothing in this world I wouldn’t do.

Can you believe they call us criminals when he’s assaulting us with that haircut?


mythology meme:  [7/8] myths, legends, and stories
↳ king arthur’s death and messianic return

Although some consider King Arthur to be a legitimate historical figure, the general consensus is that he is at least partly folklore and literary invention. In any case, King Arthur was an immensely famous leader of the Britons, dated to approximately the late fifth or early sixth century A.D. 
The stories of King Arthur and his knights became very popular in the medieval period, with the best-known accounts of the tales coming from authors such as Geoffrey of Monmouth and Chrétien de Troyes, the latter of whom introduced stories of the Holy Grail and Sir Lancelot to the legend, and whose work later became the basis for Arthurian romances. The stories pertaining the legendary king and his companions are compositely referred to as the Matter of Britain.
There are many stories of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table, but they all culminate with the Battle of Camlann, the final battle of the legendary king. The story is more or less as follows: King Arthur, after pursuing Sir Lancelot to France, returns to find that Mordred, who is traditionally either Arthur’s illegitimate son or his nephew, has taken over the land and therefore betrayed him. A battle erupts, Mordred is slain and Arthur mortally wounded.
Of King Arthur’s fate after the Battle of Camlann, there are three popularly accepted versions. The earlier states that he survived, but was transported to the mythical island of Avalon to be healed of his wounds. The later version says that he died in the battle, but was still taken to Avalon. The third version simply states that the legendary king was turned into a raven. Another, rather obscure interpretation, says that after death, he was turned into the constellation of Boötes, the brightest star of which is called Arcturus. However, all versions agree that King Arthur is fated to return one day, which is why he’s often referred to as the once and future king.

mythology meme:  [7/8] myths, legends, and stories

↳ king arthur’s death and messianic return

Although some consider King Arthur to be a legitimate historical figure, the general consensus is that he is at least partly folklore and literary invention. In any case, King Arthur was an immensely famous leader of the Britons, dated to approximately the late fifth or early sixth century A.D.

The stories of King Arthur and his knights became very popular in the medieval period, with the best-known accounts of the tales coming from authors such as Geoffrey of Monmouth and Chrétien de Troyes, the latter of whom introduced stories of the Holy Grail and Sir Lancelot to the legend, and whose work later became the basis for Arthurian romances. The stories pertaining the legendary king and his companions are compositely referred to as the Matter of Britain.

There are many stories of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table, but they all culminate with the Battle of Camlann, the final battle of the legendary king. The story is more or less as follows: King Arthur, after pursuing Sir Lancelot to France, returns to find that Mordred, who is traditionally either Arthur’s illegitimate son or his nephew, has taken over the land and therefore betrayed him. A battle erupts, Mordred is slain and Arthur mortally wounded.

Of King Arthur’s fate after the Battle of Camlann, there are three popularly accepted versions. The earlier states that he survived, but was transported to the mythical island of Avalon to be healed of his wounds. The later version says that he died in the battle, but was still taken to Avalon. The third version simply states that the legendary king was turned into a raven. Another, rather obscure interpretation, says that after death, he was turned into the constellation of Boötes, the brightest star of which is called Arcturus. However, all versions agree that King Arthur is fated to return one day, which is why he’s often referred to as the once and future king.